ARPN Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science       ISSN 1990-6145
   
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ARPN Journal of Agricultural and Biological Science                               July 2017 | Vol. 12  No. 7
 
Title:

Cotton yield and yield components can be maximized by irrigation intervals and chiseling in sandy loam soils

Author (s):

Raheel Atif Hameed, Muhammad Naveed Afzal and Shazia Anjum

Abstract:

Establishment of indeterminate growth parameters and reproductive aspects is of crucial importance during field conditions. Cotton plant has particular aspects in many ways regarding its growth and development, vegetative and reproductive as well as yield components and field management. Although it is perennial in its nature, it is much respondent to climate, environment, field, soil and field preparatory practices adopted at field level for maximum potential yield. Two year field study was designed to carry out at the research area of CCRI, Multan to investigate the effect of soil preparatory technique i.e. chiseling and crop irrigation intervals in cotton field for soil moisture holding capacity, yield of seed cotton and its components. Cotton cultivar CIM-499 was manually dibbled on silt loam soil in last week of May with bed and furrow planting method duringthe both cropping years. Split plot design was applied comprising inter culturing chiseling and interculturing no chiseling were in main plots and irrigation intervals (8 and days) treatments were kept in sub plots. Results indicated that inter culturing + chiseling produced the highest significant seed cotton production (17.8%) more bolls plant-1 (14.3%) and water intake (17.7%) than no chiseling with inter culturing. However, irrigation interval after eight days produced the maximum yield of seed cotton (14.2%), more 14.3%bolls plant-1and water retention (35.6%) than 12 days irrigation interval.

 
       
 
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Title:

Mungbean residue incorporated at different incubation periods affects soil chemical properties

Author (s):

Ghassan J. Z., W. Zakaria, A. R. Shaari and C. H. Mohammud

Abstract:

A pot trial was conducted in the greenhouse of the Institute of Sustainable Agro technology, University Malaysia Perlis, Padang Besar, Perlis, Malaysia to analyze the influence of mungbean residue on the properties of soil. The treatments involved three levels of mungbean residue at three incubation periods (5%+ 1 week, 5%+ 2 weeks, 5%+ 4 weeks, 10%+ 1 week, 10%+ 2 weeks, 10%+ 4 weeks, 15%+ 1 week, 15%+ 2 weeks and 15%+ 4 weeks) and a control treatment. The experiment was conducted within a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with five replicates. The collected data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) via statistical analysis system (SAS). The measured parameters were significantly influenced (p<0.05) by the mungbean residue treatments. The results showed that the values of calcium, potassium, magnesium, CEC, phosphorous, organic carbon, organic matter and carbon: nitrogen ratio were significantly (p< 0.05) higher than that of the control treatment. The residual effects of mungbeanresidue significantly influence the soil nutrient content. It can be concluded thatmungbeanresidue is effective in increasing the fertility of the soil.

 
 
 
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Title:

Determination of optimum corm size for saffron (Crocus Sativus L) and corm yield under the harran plain conditions

Author (s):

Abdulhabip ZEL, Kaan ERDEN and Tuncay Demirbilek

Abstract:

The present research was carried out to determine the most suitable corm size of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) in terms of saffron yield (g/m), corm yield (g/m), corm number (number/plant) and marketable corm ratio (%) during growing seasons of 2004-2005 and 2005-2006, under the Harran Plain conditions, Sanliurfa, Turkey. The field experiments were arranged in completely randomized block design with three replications and 1-2 cm, 2-4 cm, 4-7 cm, 7-10 cm circumference lengths were used as plant material. The results of study indicated that the saffron with a large size cormwasflowered earlier than the small corms. Large-size corms were also found to continue to flowering for longer period than the small corms. These findings showed that the corm size of 7-10 cm could be suggested for saffron production but not for corm production, due to lower marketable corm ratio (%) though the highest corm yield (g/m) values in small-size corm. For corm production2-4 cm and 4-7 cm sized cormscouldbe suggested. It was also determined that the corm sizes didnot significantly affect the saffron quality.

 
 
 
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